Tag Archives: Danger

Scilla peruviana

portuguese-squill

Scilla peruviana is a evergreen perennial makes a spring-time statement with 50 to 100 deep-blue, starry blossoms atop large, cone-shaped flowers. Grow it alongside other spring flowering bulb crops such as daffodils, hyacinths and tulips. These unique flowers have an impressively long bloom time. Short dark green strap-shaped leaves emerge in the fall to form tight rosettes to 18 inches ... Read More »

This Sunnyvale Garden – March 2017

lotus-berthelotti

We had average March weather in our Sunnyvale garden: about 8 days of rain but less in volume than February. We still had a lot of flowers: Pea-shrub, orinthogalum, several types of crocus, daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, freesia, armeria, plum, apricot, flowering plum, viola, cyclamen, english daisy, yarrow, bacopa, lavendar. On the vegetable side: cilantro, tomatoes, beet, garlic, rhubarb, chile, basil. ... Read More »

Wisteria 2017

wisteria-2017-closeup-web

After 5 years, our Wisteria is finally flowering! Wisteria is a beautiful spring vine. Because of my visits to the California Spanish missions, I cannot think of Wisteria without thinking of California. I planted my wisteria in probably the worst spot for it in our Sunnyvale garden: a spot nestled in an east-facing corner that only gets a few hours ... Read More »

Hyacinth – Apricot Sunset

apricot-sunset-hyacinth

We grow hyacinth in our Sunnyvale garden most years. In 2017 the first bloom was the first week in March, after the crocus have finished blooming, and right before the tulips start blooming. Attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds. Flowers are fragrant. This plant is suitable for growing indoors. Muscari aka grape hyacinth, is a different genus than the Dutch ... Read More »

This Sunnyvale Garden – February 2017

pickwick-crocus

We had a very wet February in our Sunnyvale garden. But we still had a lot of flowers: Pea-shrub, orinthogalum, several types of crocus, daffodils, armeria, plum, apricot, flowering plum, viola, cyclamen, english daisy, yarrow, lavendar. On the vegetable side: cilantro, tomatoes, beet, garlic, rhubarb, chile, basil. Lots of spring growth: swartzkopf, mulberry, figs, milkweed, foxglove, caesurium, bleeding-heart, lily-of-the-valley, verbascum, ... Read More »

English Daisy – Bellis perennis

english-daisy

English Daisies have long been popular for spring bedding, particularly in mild winter regions. Plants are biennial, usually lasting through one season, but self-seeding to provide future generations. This strain flowers well even in the first year, with little double button flowers of bright rose pink. Removing faded flowers regularly will keep plants blooming well into the summer. Often used ... Read More »

Cyclamen – Latinia Salmon

cyclamen-salmon

Cyclamen is a great winter-flowering plant that loves light shade. You can grow in indoors or out. I am currently using them as a winter highlight in my former firepit. The red cyclamen is classic for the winter holidays. This salmon variety is also pretty. Strong stems bear vibrant, filly flowers well above attractive, silver-mottled leaves. In the summer, the ... Read More »

This Sunnyvale Garden – June 2016

queen-fabiola

There was lots of activity in our Sunnyvale garden this past May: Spring flowers were finishing their bloom;. Summer flowers were pumping out new growth and, in some cases, early flowers. The stone fruits- plums, nectarines, and apricots – got larger and starting getting color. The tomato plants range in size from 2 to 4 feet in height. Some are ... Read More »

Daffodil

daffodil-landscape

Daffodils are a sign of spring. All parts of the daffodil contain a toxic chemical, lycorine. The part of the plant that contains the highest concentration of lycorine is the bulb. However, eating any part of the plant can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/48947/#ixzz41z7d6QJs Read More »

Begonia boliviens s. ‘Santa Cruz Sunset’

20524005033_santacruzsunset

The Santa Cruz Sunset begonia has dramatic angled petals. These plants fall into the tropical and subtropical category of perennials, growing well in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 through 11. Many varieties with ornamental leaves and blossoms grow well outside in USDA zones 10 and 11, while hardy begonias survive winters in USDA zones 6 through 9 ... Read More »