Dianthus

The name Dianthus is from the Greek words dios (“god”) and anthos (“flower”), and was cited by the Greek botanist Theophrastus. The color pink may be named after the flower, coming from the frilled edge of the flowers: the verb “pink” dates from the 14th century and means “to decorate with a perforated or punched pattern”.

Ecology: Dianthus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Cabbage Moth, Double-striped Pug, Large Yellow Underwing and The Lychnis

Dianthus species have been extensively bred and hybridised to produce many thousands of cultivars for garden use and floristry, in all shades of white, pink, yellow and red, with a huge variety of flower shapes and markings. They are often divided into the following main groups:

  • Border carnations – fully hardy, growing to 60 cm (24 in), large blooms
  • Perpetual flowering carnations – grown under glass, flowering throughout the year, often used for exhibition purposes, growing to 150 cm (59 in)
  • Malmaison carnations – derived from the variety ‘Souvenir de la Malmaison’, growing to 70 cm (28 in), grown for their intense “clove” fragrance
  • Old-fashioned pinks – older varieties; evergreen perennials forming mounds of blue-green foliage with masses of flowers in summer, growing to 45 cm (18 in)
  • Modern pinks – newer varieties, growing to 45 cm (18 in), often blooming two or three times per year
  • Alpine pinks – mat-forming perennials, suitable for the rockery or alpine garden, growing to 10 cm (4 in)

Details

Maiden Pink, Dianthus deltoides

 

Family: Caryophyllaceae (kar-ree-oh-fil-AY-see-ee) (Info)

Genus: Dianthus (dy-AN-thus) (Info)

Species: deltoides (del-TOY-deez) (Info)

 

Category:

Perennials

 

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

 

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

 

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 °C (-40 °F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 °C (-35 °F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

 

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

 

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

 

Bloom Color:

Pink

Red

White/Near White

 

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

 

Foliage:

Evergreen

 

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

 

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

8.6 to 9.0 (strongly alkaline)

 

Patent Information:

Non-patented

 

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

 

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

 

Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/4/#ixzz3GpN4C6Sn

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