Narrow-leaf Blue-eyed Grass

Sisyrinchium angustifolium is noted for its violet-blue flowers and branched flowering stems. Though their foliage is grass-like, the blue-eyed grasses belong to the iris family not the grass family. It is native to southeast USA where it occurs in damp open woods, slopes and along stream banks. It is a clump-forming perennial that features a tuft of narrow grass-like leaves (to 3/16″ wide) typically growing to 12″ (less frequently to 20″) tall. Clusters of violet-blue flowers (to 1/2″ across), each with 6 pointed tepals and a yellow eye, appear in spring on stalks growing from leaf-like bracts atop usually branched flowering stems which are distinctively flattened.
First planted in my sunnyvale garden in 2015.

The main toxic component is the resinoid irisin.

Details

Family: Iridaceae (eye-rid-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sisyrinchium (sis-ee-RINK-ee-um) (Info)
Species: angustifolium (an-gus-tee-FOH-lee-um) (Info)
Synonym:Sisyrinchium bermudiana
Synonym:Sisyrinchium graminoides
Synonym:Sisyrinchium gramineum
Synonym:Sisyrinchium bermudianum

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View this plant in a garden

Category:
Perennials

Height:
12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:
9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 °C (-40 °F)
USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 °C (-35 °F)
USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 °C (-30 °F)
USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 °C (-25 °F)
USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 °C (-20 °F)
USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 °C (-15 °F)
USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 °C (-10 °F)
USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 °C (-5 °F)
USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 °C (0 °F)
USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 °C (5 °F)
USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 °C (10 °F)
USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 °C (15 °F)

Sun Exposure:
Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:
Unknown – Tell us

Bloom Color:
Medium Blue
White/Near White

Bloom Time:
Mid Spring

Foliage:
Grown for foliage
Herbaceous

Other details:
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)
From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:
Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed
Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds
Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds
Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/491/#ixzz3Urr7CToW

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