Jade Plant in winter

During winter in Sunnyvale, the Jade plant is covered with white flowers. It’s is frequently visited by our resident hummingbird. Jade Plant (aka Jade Tree, Money Tree) is a great landscape plant for the Sunnyvale garden. It is a succulent that needs little watering.

Jade plant is toxic to pets and can cause vomiting and a slow heart rate. In 40 years, our cats have never demostrated any interest in eating jade plant.

Details

Family: Crassulaceae (krass-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Crassula (KRASS-oo-la) (Info)
Species: ovata (oh-VAY-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Crassula argentea
Synonym:Crassula portulacea

Category:
Tropicals and Tender Perennials
Cactus and Succulents

Height:
4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:
24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:
USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 °C (20 °F)
USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)
USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)
USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)
USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
N/A

Bloom Color:
Pink
Purple
White/Near White

Bloom Time:
Mid Winter

Foliage:
Grown for foliage

Other details:
This plant is suitable for growing indoors
Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:
Non-patented

Propagation Methods:
Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

Seed Collecting:
Unknown – Tell us
Read more: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/9/#ixzz3JFczkr7R

Cultivation

As a succulent, Crassula ovata requires little water in the summer, and even less in the winter. The jade plant is a little susceptible to overwatering. C. ovata is famous for garnishing a red tinge around its leaves when grown with bright sunlight. In more extreme cases, the green colour of the plant is lost and can be replaced by yellow. This is caused by the jade plant making pigments such as carotenoids to protect from harsh sunlight and ultraviolet rays. The jade plant also does best in rich, well-draining soil. The plant also flowers in the wintertime, particularly during a cooler, darker, dry spell. C. ovata is sometimes attacked by mealybugs, a common nuisance of the succulents. state=”close”]

Propagation

The jade plant is also known for its ease of propagation, which can be spurred by clippings or even stray leaves which fall from the plant. Jade plants propagate readily from both with success rates higher with cuttings. In the wild, propagation is the jade plant’s main method of reproduction. Branches regularly fall off wild jade plants and these branches may root and form new plants.

Like many succulents, jade plants can be propagated from just the swollen leaves which grow in pairs on the stems. While propagation methods may vary, most will follow similar steps. Typically, the wounds on the leaves are left to dry and callous over. Then the leaves are placed in or on soil. Roots begin to grow on severed leaves about 4 weeks after being removed from the stem. Environmental factors such as temperature and humidity affect the speed at which the roots and new plant develop. Foliage usually appears soon after new roots have formed.

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