Tag Archives: xeriscape

Nopal Cactus

Nopal (also known as the Prickly Pear cactus) is hardy, drought-tolerant, and reproduces easily by cuttings. Forty years ago I took a small cactus pad from the home of my wife’s grandmother in Hollister California. Nopal is a species and an ingredient made from the Opuntia cacti, in the subfamily Opuntioideae. They are particularly common in their native Mexico where …

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Cosmos

Common Cosmos, Mexican Aster. Cosmos are annuals, grown for their showy flowers. The flowerheads may be bowl– or open cup–shaped and are atop of long stems. Cosmos are easy to grow and make good border or container plants. They make for good decorations in flower arrangements and also attract birds, bees, and butterflies to your garden.   Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info) …

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Sempervivium

Sempervivum /sɛmpəˈvaɪvəm/, is a genus of about 40 species of flowering plants in the Crassulaceae family, known as houseleeks. Other common names include liveforever and hen and chicks. They are succulent perennials forming mats composed of tufted leaves in rosettes. In favorable conditions they spread rapidly via offsets, and several species are valued in cultivation as groundcover for dry, sunny …

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Jade plant

Jade Plant (aka Jade Tree, Money Tree) is a great landscape plant for the Sunnyvale garden. It is a succulent that needs little watering.

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Moon Cactus

Gymnocalycium mihanovichii is a species of cactus from South America commonly grown as a houseplant. The most popular cultivars are variegated mutants which completely lack chlorophyll, exposing the underlying red, orange or yellow pigmentation. These cultivars are often called moon cactus. Since chorophyll is necessary for photosynthesis, these mutations die as seedlings unless grafted onto another cactus with normal chlorophyll. …

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Lantana

Lantana is a great landscape plant. It attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. It is very drought-tolerant once established. Every winter I cut it back to its stumps; every autumn the plant has grown 12 feet wide. Obviously, you can prune it smaller.

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Purslane

Common in our Sunnyvale yards but little known in the North American kitchen, purslane is both delicious and exceptionally nutritious. Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea) — also known as duckweed, fatweed, pursley, pussley, verdolagas and wild portulaca — is the most frequently reported “weed” species in the world. It can grow anywhere that has at least a two-month growing season. My …

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Schwarzkopf

Aeonium arboreum “Schwarzkopf Black Rose” Succulent is a Latin word meaning juicy, and is descriptive of many plants and plant families that store water in their leaves, stems and roots. Succulents can survive long periods of drought, even to a year, with this storage capacity. Aeoniums have handsome rosettes of fleshy leaves, one of which bears a spectacular terminal holding …

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Calandrinia Spectabilis

Calandrinia is a plant genus that contains many species of purslane, including the redmaids. The genus was named for Jean Louis Calandrini, an 18th-century Swiss botanist. It includes around 150 species of annual herbs which bear colorful flowers in shades of red to purple and white. Plants of this genus are native to Australia, Chile, and western North America. This …

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India Hawthorn

Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis sp.) is prized as a small, low-maintenance shrub or ground cover native to southern China and Japan and cultivated across U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8 through 11. Various cultivars of Indian hawthorn offer attractive foliage, white to pink flowers and a slight range in available plant sizes. This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies …

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